Strength Training

Want to reduce body fat, increase lean muscle mass and burn calories more efficiently? Strength training to the rescue! Strength training is a key component of overall health and fitness for everyone.

 

Our Strength Training Classes are part of our adult group class packages. You can use your class membership to  go to CrossFit Classes our Strength Classes and our HIIT Classes.

Intense Workout

Use it or lose it

Lean muscle mass naturally diminishes with age.

You'll increase the percentage of fat in your body if you don't do anything to replace the lean muscle you lose over time. Strength training can help you preserve and enhance your muscle mass at any age.

Strength training makes you stronger and fitter.

This benefit is the obvious one, but it shouldn’t be overlooked. “Muscle strength is crucial in making it easier to do the things you need to do on a day-to-day basis, especially as we get older and naturally start to lose muscle.

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Strength training protects bone health and muscle mass.

Osteoporosis is when your bones get weaker as you get older. Strength training can help prevent it or keep it from getting worse. Exercise triggers the cells that form bone into action. Your hips, spine, and wrists can get the biggest benefit from strength training. They’re also the places most likely to  be affected by osteoporosis.

At around age 30 we start losing as much as 3 to 5 percent of lean muscle mass per year thanks to aging. 

 

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You Shed Pounds

Lifting weight can help you carry less weight. Strength training can get rid of body fat and help you burn more calories. Keeping your muscles healthy also can help prevent injuries that can happen while you’re doing aerobic exercise like walking or running.

 

Resistance workout increases your excess post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC), referring to the calories your body continues to burn after a workout.” [Resistance or strengthening exercise] keeps your metabolism active after exercising, much longer than after an aerobic workout.

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